Tag Archives: Texas

Congress attempts to weigh in on BCS

Rep. Joe Barton, a U.S. congressman from Texas, is stepping up for Mack Brown, Colt McCoy and all those pissed off fans in the lone-star state.

Barton has decided to take on the Bowl Championship Series, introducing a bill that would abolish the BCS system. This isn’t the first time Congress’ legislation landed in the realm of sports; An inprint was left on baseball with the Mitchell Report, making some change in the process, but is this BCS bill warranted? Sure, the BCS is a faulty system that is incapable of picking the top two teams in the nation, but there is not any illegal action to police here, as there was with steroids in baseball.

An eerie coincidence in the instance is that the congressman happens to be from Texas, the home of the most publicize hosing by the BCS, which happened to the Longhorns when they were bypassed for national championship contention by the same Oklahoma team they defeated 35-45.

My thought is that congress has bigger things on its plate than football right now. A faltering economy, and a host of begging bankers and car companies is where their attention should lye, not with Texas football. Nevertheless, Barton let his feelings on the BCS be heard.

“In some years, the sport’s national championship winner was left unsettled, and at least one school was left out of the many millions of dollars in revenue that accompany the title,” Barton said in a statement. “Despite repeated efforts to improve the system, the controversy rages on.”

While Barton was very vague in his assessment, and didn’t really offer an alternative, to a certain degree, he is right. Something need to be done, but he is very wrong in suggesting congress’ efforts should be placed towards college football and its championship system in such a tumultuous time.

Barton says the bill, which is co-sponsored by Reps. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., and Michael McCaul, R-Texas, “will prohibit the marketing, promotion and advertising of a postseason game as a ‘national championship’ football game, unless it is the result of a playoff system.”

USC of 2003, and Auburn of 2004 were cited as championship-caliber teams left out of the national-title picture by the BCS. He made reference to this years undefeated and one-loss teams without implicated himself as a Texas homer.

“This year, we again have two teams with one loss each playing for the ‘championship,’ while two undefeated teams and four additional teams with only one loss will play in bowl games, but none can become ‘champion,’ “

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The BCS is dumb

95934I’ve never written a more elementary headline, but no other statement would better suit the idiocracy that is the Bowl Championship Series.

Listen to this and tell me if it makes any sense what so ever: Texas beats Oklahoma, the teams mount identical 11-1 records and Oklahoma bypasses Texas to compete in the Big 12 championship.

All conventional wisdom would say there is no better indicator of who the better team is than a head-to-head matchup, but that apparently means nothing in the Texas-Oklahoma case, where the Sooners were awarded the Big 12 south division, having lost 45-35 to the team they tied.

Texas was jobbed — everyone knows it, but no one will do anything about it. The Longhorns were a Michael Crabtree touchdown away from a national title, while Texas defeated Oklahoma by 10 points. Yet, they failed to beat out Oklahoma.

Why, you ask. Because, and this only happens in college football, style points matter.

Not even a 49-9 thumping of Texas A & M could deliver the Longhorns to the Big 12 championship game against Missouri. It may have something to do with their counterpart averages upwards of 50 points per game, notches 500 total yards per game and posts a 28 point margin of victory.

What makes matter worse is Texas wasn’t far behind. They too, average an astronomical amount of points at a staggering 43 point per game, they too, post an inconceivable margin of victory with a 25-point advantage and, they too, average nearly 500 yards per game.

What a mess this has become, and no one is willing to take the blame.

Each year, a similar scenario arises. I didn’t even mention that Texas Tech also posted one loss and gave Texas its only loss, Penn State was an Iowa field goal away from undefeated and USC was one hell of a game by a Oregon State away from a national title. Every season displays greater reasoning for the dismissal of the current bowl system, but changes are never made.

Until someone smartens up, or someone within a position of power speaks up, teams will get hosed every year and miss out on opportunities they rightfully deserve.

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Upsets are bigger in Texas

Just like a host of No.1s before them, Texas couldn’t stay undefeated and lost to Texas Tech 33-39. The Tech win was followed by a flurry of fans that rushed the field in Lubbock, Texas.

Graham Harrell, Michael Crabtree and a stable of wide receivers lit the Longhorns defense up for 474 yards. Texas Tech simply outsmarted the Texas defense with a bevy of offensive looks and an evasive Harrell, who found receivers coming back to the ball all night.

The game got ugly, early as the Red Raiders went up 19-0 in the 2nd quarter. Through sheer will, Colt McCoy was able to mount a comeback with a stagnant offense full of wide receivers that dropped balls, a bad offensive line and no running game.

McCoy managed to get his team a 33-32 lead at the end of the game, but Texas Tech did what it had all game — march down the field for an easy score. They finished the game with a 28 yard pass and catch by the two players that ruled the day. The Graham-Crabtree connection was the last touchdown of the contest that ended with a score of 33-39.

Texas’ loss opened the floodgates for a number of teams to step in as the new No. 1. Big Ten surprise studs Penn State, who downed Ohio State last Saturday, seem to be on the fast track to No.1, as Jo Pa’ No.3 ranked Nittany Lions are a perfect 9-0. No. 2 Alabama is probably next in line for the spot.

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